Earth Science for Eastport Middle School science
This advanced level science course covers the fundamental and principle concepts of human anatomy and physiology and microbiology. This course is designed to be a preparatory course for students interested in pursuing a field in medical and health related study or science. It will be driven by activities, laboratory investigations, class discussions, and some lecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the structure and function of cells, tissues, and human organ systems. The course will cover: anatomy and physiology, chemistry basics, cells, tissues, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, sensory system, endocrine system, cardiovascular system, lymphatic system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system. This course will count for advanced standing. Prerequisites: Intro Chemistry and Biology or instructor consent.
This course is designed to teach the Life Science portion of the Maine Learning Result standards covering the Living Environment. There are five major categories specific to this section of the standards covering: Biodiversity, Ecosystems, Cells, Heredity and Reproduction, and Evolution.

The course will combine lecture, readings, literature research, and investigations to develop understanding and mastery of the content where feasible.

This online tool will be used to allow students in the class to track where they have been, where they are, and where they are going with the material. If missing class for any reason, this is one of the resources that should help to keep up with the material. This resource will not be used as a gradebook tool for this course. The gradebook will be Web2School.

Parents are encouraged to view posts and monitor their students progress in the course; however, they should not post or contribute content to the site. This is a student, virtual classroom tool. Also, they are reminded that contributions to the site are part of the learning process and students should feel comfortable knowing that any material posted in this are is not subject to public scrutiny. Most of the content in this environment is not visible to other members of the class. An exception to this will be some of the collaboration activities that will allow students to have discussions about the material in the class or to ask the teachers questions that others may find helpful as well. This is not a personal chat room for non-class related discussions.

Anyone using this tool should be aware that all content is monitored and is subject to school rules. Inappropriate behavior, content, language, or etiquette will be referred to the office and result in disciplinary action as well as loss of grade points. Any student that feels that their account has been compromised should report this to the teacher right away. At no time should passwords be shared or transferred to others because you are responsible for the material posted under your account. Again, all traffic and activity on this site may be logged and monitored for appropriate use.

Anyone who finds material on the site that is not appropriate should report this to the teacher for immediate review.
This biology course is a full year, general course that combines ecology and biology together. Students will study a range of biology concepts including population dynamics, ecosystems, cycles of matter, biochemistry, genetics, evolution, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and classification.
This course is an in-depth look at the role of genetics on species diversity, function, and form. In the course, investigations will highlight the impact of DNA within biological systems to understand how organisms maintain stability. Students will also investigate the impact of environmental conditions on the epigenome. To prepare students for further work in sciences, the course will focus on three primary objectives: to develop a strong foundation for Mendelian genetics, to become familiar with the roles of DNA, and to understand the terminology of genetics and biology. This course is an honors level course with a prerequisite of intro-chemistry and intro-biology or equivalents.
This course focuses on the skills necessary to develop and maintain a sustainable garden for local consumption. ...
General introduction to life sciences.
This course is designed to give students an understanding of the ecology component of biology and the principles set out in the Maine Learning Results. Together we examine our role in the world by studying the biosphere and different factors impact on it. Ecology then examines the unique interrelationships among the various components within the global system. Limiting factors are studied to develop proposals for mechanisms to sustain a balance between human impact and environmental responsibility. Biochemical factors are also included to understand how the chemistry of life is suited to maintain diversity and stability. The course utilizes technology and laboratory exploration in the classroom to strengthen understanding. The textbook is used to develop a vernacular for communicating the information. The use of discussions, outlines, quizzes, tests, and projects will demonstrate competency in the subjects and readiness to advance.

Intro Ecology - Honors:
This honors ecology course challenges students to understand the complex interactions between the living and non-living world. The close interrelationships between individuals and their environment are examined. Key concepts include the characteristics of life, cycles of matter, population dynamics, conservation, classification, and a brief introduction to biochemistry. Students explore the affects of changes in ecological stability from altering various factors such as temperature, pH, population, and other limiting factors. The role of biochemical factors on the sustainability of life is also examined to help connect students to prior knowledge and build the terminology necessary for successful completion of future study. This course is an honors level course with a prerequisite of intro-chemistry and intro-biology or equivalents.

In the honors course, students lead the content integration and transfer responsibility for elements of the learning process from the instructor to the individual. The instructor acts as a facilitator to ensure that material is introduced and appropriate conclusions are developed. Projects, research, and discussions foster this conversion.
This biology course challenges students to examine the living world around them for meaning and understanding. Students examine cellular biology and genetics with an emphasis on how different organisms maintain stability in their environment, undergo division, and convert energy into usable forms. Laboratory investigations foster understanding through application of skills and critical thinking.

In the honors course, students lead the content integration and transfer responsibility for elements of the learning process from the instructor to the individual. The instructor acts as a facilitator to ensure that material is introduced and appropriate conclusions are developed. Projects, research, and discussions foster this conversion.

This course is designed to be the fourth in a series; however, students who have completed sufficient prior science course work are able to enroll in this course without completing Science I – III first. Regardless, students are expected to have a background in basic chemistry, scientific principles, and critical thinking skills.